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After the Decision...
by Patricia Woods on 

We tend to think of decisions as the end point. But decisions are actually only tools to keep us on the right path. Before we make decisions we need to know what our priorities are, what is of value to us. Our decisions then become a series of choices that keep us on that path.


The more clarity in our direction the less angst in our decision making. 


The first step is identifying what is important to you and the second is developing the emotional strength to stand by your decisions.


I posted last week about moving forward once you make your decision rather than doubting the decision. Itís also important to pay attention to the effects that result from the decision.


Are they satisfying? Do they fit in with where you are trying to go? Each decision is an opportunity to move further along your path. Take the time to question if you are moving in the right direction.


Hereís a recent example. I decided I needed to get up earlier in the morning to have gym time as well as writing time. So last week I got up at 5am, made it to the gym and also had time to write before I started my work day. The first week was amazing.


The next week I wound up with three early morning meetings. I hadnít thought about my new plan when I offered these time slots. That week wasnít quite as amazing. I had no time for writing and only went to the gym once.


I had made decisions without thinking about my new plan. I didnít like the fallout and recognized I needed to speak up and change my schedule. Thatís where the emotional strength comes in. The ability to hold fast to what is important rather than just going along.  


With that understanding I had the choice to either go along with a decision that discounts my needs or move forward and make changes to reflect my needs. The more we ignore our wrong turns the more unhappy and confused we feel.


Rather than feeling that I made a wrong decision I recognized that my decision brought something to light. Going forward I will pay much more attention to my schedule, being aware to only make early morning appointments when it is urgent.


If we can recognize that decision making supports us along our chosen paths by giving us needed information, it can feel less daunting. We can look forward to decision making with eagerness rather than fear or doubt.


It may also be that there isnít a right or wrong decision but simply a decision that supports our needs at the time. So the more we keep judgment out of the mix the better. Decision making is simply our best effort to get us to where we want to go. And the after effects of the decision will let us know our next move.



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